Deviled, Stuffed, and Dressed Hard-Boiled Eggs… YUM.

easterbunny-egg-1820-20110414-1022It’s that time of year, where we dye a bunch of hard-boiled eggs, and then we have to figure out how to use them up over the next few days.

I’ve always been a big fan of deviled, stuffed and dressed eggs.

The difference between deviled, dressed, and stuffed eggs is negligible. (A rose by any other name…)  The ingredients for all are pretty simple: take a whole, peeled hard-boiled egg cut lengthwise. Scoop out the yolk. Mash it. , enhance it, and plop it back into the empty depression on the white half.  Who hasn’t had those?

They are so popular that special plates are sold to cradle the egg halves.

Cookbooks have referenced them since the Romans (although they stuffed their hard-boiled-egg yolks with raisins and honey). In the 1500s in England, instructions appear in cookbooks to “farce” the yolks (meaning mush them up, usually with other ingredients) and re-place them in the egg. The concept is widespread, and popular worldwide.

The term deviled is a description in old cookbooks — that usually meant something  especially hot and spicy.

(Wait, no hard and fast rules here…Devil’s food chocolate cake is not hot and spicy; it was named to contrast with angel food, the exceptionally white, light, and airy sponge cake made with a great many egg whites.)

The first known reference to deviled was in an English cookbook in 1786. In the 1800’s, it was very common to find described as deviled various recipes. This was quite risque, as the usually boring bland food lacked the devilish pinch of cayenne or tiny dollop of minced horseradish.

Oh so tame by today’s chili-pepper-obsessed standards.

At the Oxford Symposium on Food & Cookery in 2006, Nancy R. McArthur related the following item reported in The New York Times (June 13, 1904) entitled “Angel Cake and Deviled Eggs Barred” (page 6):

“The popularity of deviled eggs was not without controversy as erupted in 1904 in Fort Washington, Pennsylvania. The all-male officers of the Reformed Church voted against permitting deviled eggs and angel cake at the June fete. In their view, having deviled eggs would bring profane objects within the sacred edifice while angel cake would be sacrilegious. Women planning the fete cancelled the event in a fit of pique, refusing to bow to the will of the sanctimonious menfolk. Similar issues arose in the southern states, sometimes requiring a change in the dish’s name.”

Because of this controversy, parts of the U.S. still refer to deviled eggs as dressed or stuffed.

For years I thought that deviled eggs were ONLY egg yolk mixed with store-made jar mayonnaise. How wrong I was.

In Northern Europe, it is not uncommon to mix the yolks with stale white bread that has been soaked in milk, along with mustard and parsley. Germany is fond of stuffed eggs with anchovy and capers.  Old recipes use softened butter instead of mayonnaise. Other recipes use substitutes such as dry, Greek-style yogurt; heavy whipping cream; sour cream; cream cheese; hummus; or in the case of a mid-twentieth-century American recipe using a very American cheese-product invention, the neon-orange Cheez Whiz, for a cheesy egg concoction (No comment. I haven’t tried it.)

More-exotic binder ingredients (instead of mayonnaise) are mashed avocado, olive or other oil, and coconut milk. Additions to the egg yolk include pureed artichoke hearts; minced olives; diced sun-dried tomatoes; bits of chicken, fish, or bacon; mashed potato; bread crumbs; and ground nutmeats. In one popular variation, Russian eggs, the eggs are filled with caviar and served with a rémoulade sauce.

A couple of recipes from my collection

Deviled egg recipes all have the same instructions (unless noted): cut peeled hard-boiled eggs lengthwise; remove yolks; mash them; and add enough of a binder such as mayonnaise, butter, or yogurt to make the yolks creamy and hold them together. Mix in with other ingredients and spices. Return the yolk mixture to the center depression in the egg white (with a spoon or a pastry bag). Garnish with a spice (typically paprika) and/or other ingredients such as parsley, cilantro, or caviar

My Mother’s Deviled Eggs

  • 12 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and cut lengthwise
  • ¼ cup mayonnaise (more or less as needed to make yolks creamy)
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • ½ teaspoon curry powder
  • paprika for garnish

Yogurt Deviled Eggs

  • 12 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and cut lengthwise
  • 1/3 cup plain Greek-style yogurt
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • Dash Tabasco sauce
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika
  • salt, to taste
  • Paprika, for garnish

Old-Fashioned Butter Deviled Eggs

  • 12 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and cut lengthwise
  • 3 tablespoons softened sweet cream butter
  • ½ teaspoon dry mustard
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1-2 teaspoons heavy cream (more or less as needed to make yolks creamy)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Paprika, for garnish

Bean Deviled Eggs

  • 12 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and cut lengthwise
  • 2 tablespoons cream cheese
  • 2 tablespoons sour cream
  • 2 tablespoons refried beans
  • Tabasco sauce, to taste
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced red onion
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced parsley
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced cilantro
  • ½ teaspoon finely minced fresh oregano (or ¼ teaspoon dried)

 

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